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RADICAL RABBIT

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Western United: New Melbourne A-League side to confirm name, colours
Dominic Bossi
By Dominic Bossi
February 12, 2019 — 5.22pm

The A-League's 11th club is set to confirm its name and colours, with the Western Melbourne Group's winning bid likely to enter next season's competition as Western United Football Club, wearing a green and black playing strip.

The first components of the team's new identity were shaped by the public with the Western United name and the colour combination emerging as the most popular from online polls run on the club's website and on another by News Limited. The new club will call Geelong's Kardinia Park home for at least its first two seasons before relocating to a purpose-built football stadium in Tarneit, in Melbourne's west.

New identity: West Melbourne representatives Steve Horvat and Kate Roffey.
New identity: West Melbourne representatives Steve Horvat and Kate Roffey.

Due to its catchment area, the club specifically chose to omit the word "Melbourne" in its name to disassociate itself from the city's CBD, soon to be rivals Melbourne Victory and Melbourne City as well aligning the club closer with the vast region between Geelong and Westgate bridge.
Among the other options put forward to fans were online were the names: Western Melbourne Athletic, Westside Pride and Western Melbourne Warriors. The other colours to choose from were a mainly black shirt with teal trimming, a yellow and red jersey as well as a green shirt with white sleeves. There was also a green and red shirt as well as an all white strip with a green stripe.

Striking: Celtic used a green and black strip during their Champions League campaign in 2006.
Striking: Celtic used a green and black strip during their Champions League campaign in 2006.

Green was overwhelmingly the most popular option by fans. FFA sources suggest their preference was not for the team to use a plain green kit due to a potential clash with digital sponsorship on broadcasts, and preferred either a predominantly white or black kit.

The final jersey design is yet to be finalised but it's likely Western United will wear a green and black striped jersey in their inaugural year and a white away strip.
Mark Rudan is favoured to be appointed the team's first head coach while the club has already announced its first two players, Socceroo Josh Risdon and Greek international Panagiotis Kone.

The 26-year-old Risdon signed a two-year deal following last week's announcement that Greek international Kone would be the club's first marquee player.

"I'm absolutely stoked to be the first Australian player to join Western Melbourne. With the signing of Panagiotis as the marquee, I can see the club has big ambitions both on the park and off it," Risdon said via a statement on Tuesday.


A bit silly being called "Western United" in a national comp. It sounds like they are from Western Australia. Too many clubs called "United" too. Since they have chosen green and black as their colours then hopefully the Macarthur team will choose black and white as their colours, with a jersey similar in design to Juventus.
 
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stanleyg

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Despite the unexplained coach sacking the Matildas are still doing well.
 

RADICAL RABBIT

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March 4 2019 - 3:34PM
Community has its say on Macarthur South West United's future

Hundreds of soccer enthusiasts joined together in Campbelltown on Thursday night to have their say on the south-west's new A-League team.

Campbelltown Catholic Club's The Cube was filled almost to capacity for the Macarthur South West United's inaugural community forum.

A panel of experts gave the audience an insight into the club which will join the Hyundai A-League in the 2020/21 season, while residents had a chance to ask questions about the new venture.

The panel consisted of Macarthur South West United deputy chairman Gino Marra, former Socceroo Brett Emerton, club director Sam Krslovic, and the bid's financial backer, Walker Corporation executive chairman Lang Walker.

All four men spoke about the importance of investing in the Macarthur and south-west Sydney's community, and developing the region's youth.
Mr Marra said soccer was in south-west Sydney's "DNA".

"Our goal is to become one club, one voice, one community," he said.

"With your [residents'] input, we'll take our time to get this foundation right.

"We also have seven NPL [National Premier League] clubs in our region and we need to work closely with them."

Mr Emerton, who is the bid's ambassador, said the club needed to invest in supporting the region's youth.

"I see youth development as being very important for this club," he said.

"We need to give youth an elite pathway to the top…. we want to keep talented kids on our doorstep.

"We want to be a football club that the community can be part of, and be proud of."

Mr Krslovic agreed and said the club wanted to generate a good culture through running youth development programs.

"We can't guarantee kids will become an elite player, but we guarantee that they will come out of our program as a better person," he said.

Mr Walker spoke about the importance to support and develop local children and grassroots clubs.

"It's all about getting our foundations right… this is not a short-term club," he said.

Soccer enthusiasts travelled from as far as Bankstown and Fairfield for Thursday night's forum.

The floor was opened to the audience by event emcee, Fox Sports commentator Daniel Garb.

Topics covered included ticket prices (answer: looking to make affordable), the club's recruitment process (establishing a database of potential players) and plans for a women's team (seen as a future priority).

Mr Marra closed the event by encouraging residents to participate in the club's community engagement survey.

The online survey allows people to give feedback on the club's potential name, colours and mascot.

Mr Marra said further community forums would be held across south-west Sydney in the coming months.

 
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RADICAL RABBIT

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What will A-League expansion mean for the A-League TV deal?

A key reason why FFA selected the newest expansion clubs was to boost the A-League’s falling TV ratings. The fate of the league could hinge on their success or failure.

Success for these new clubs will largely depend on how many fans they can attract and they have just a short amount of time to find them. They need to make an impact right from the start.

Starting with Western United, they have some serious challenges to overcome and it’s going to be an uphill battle to attract and keep supporters. The bid had originally started as a Geelong-based proposal but the bid team soon saw that there wouldn’t be enough support there.

Geelong has just 4-5,000 registered players, most of whom don’t watch the A-League and of those who do most already support either Victory or City. But most people in Geelong support the Cats in the AFL and they would be the biggest competitor for attention.

This then led the bid team to turn their attention to Western Melbourne with its population of over 700,000 people.

Unfortunately, there aren’t any suitable stadiums in Western Melbourne that are up to A-League standard, so they’ll have to build their own. This has led to them taking matches to Kardinia Park in Geelong and Eureka Stadium in Ballarat during the long construction process.

Both of these however are oval shaped and in the case of Kardinia Park, it has 36,000 seats. Not to mention being a two-hour round trip from Tarneit by car.

When you think that a popular and well-established club like Wanderers struggle to get their fans to travel just 11km to another stadium in the same city, it’s hard to see many fans from Western Melbourne making the journey to Kardinia Park on a regular basis. Likewise, to Ballarat.

Brisbane Roar have had a similar problem getting their fans to travel to the Gold Coast when Lang Park has been unavailable. Again, it’s the same story.

When it comes to the other expansion team in Sydney however, things look a bit more positive.

Unlike Western United who will have a nomadic start to life, the South West Sydney-Macarthur club will play out of Campbelltown Stadium from Round 1, while it is upgraded. Having a single home will be a major advantage that they will have compared to Western United.

Additionally, Campbelltown Stadium has ample parking close by as well as a railway station that’s within 100 metres of the ground.

These are big differences compared to Western United who will need to have a railway station built and paid for by the Victorian Government. It might have helped Western United if they had chosen to build their stadium close to either Laverton or Hoppers Crossing stations instead.

Crowds at Campbelltown stadium have been modest for matches involving Sydney FC with typical attendances of around 5-6,000 but a couple of Wanderers matches have drawn crowds of about 10,000.

It’s hard to know exactly what sort of crowds SWSM will get, but they’re certainly making a big effort to engage the community having rolled out a club survey to over 80,000 people to work out the club’s name, colours and logo as well as working through other issues.

When it comes to identity, the South West Sydney / Macarthur region already has some history to draw upon with the Western Suburbs Magpies NRL team.

After looking through some of the comments on their Facebook page there was a clear preference for black and white to be the club’s colours.

A few kit designs were put up with the classic black and white stripes being in there as well as a white shirt with a black band across the chest similar to Fulham and another with a diagonal black sash on white, similar to Vasco Da Gama.

The same person who posted the Fulham and Vasco Da Gama style designs also designed a black and white crest, featuring the historic Lansdowne Bridge from the Southern Districts association logo in the top left corner and a ram from Macarthur in the bottom right divided by a sash reading Athletic.

This symbolically unites the two main associations in the region.

I think that Macarthur will be able to create a strong community vibe similar to Wanderers, albeit on a smaller scale. It’ll be good to see the Black and White Army up one end and the Red and Black Bloc down the other in the Western Sydney Derby.

When it comes to the West Gate Derby it might not be too bad, when you think that the latest instalment of the Melbourne Derby drew 32,000 fans with only about 5-6,000 of those supporting Melbourne City, then Western United might actually be able to match that figure.

So, looking at both new expansion clubs it’s a bit of a mixed bag.

Both seek to represent catchment areas in large growth corridors and each has real potential for the future. But I don’t think that either is likely to provide enough of a boost to TV viewing numbers in time to really increase the size of the next TV deal.

This is a problem when the clubs are asking for 90 per cent of TV revenue, up from 65 per cent at present.

How owners will react if they can’t get a return on their investment rather than continuing to lose money is the big question.

As it says in the FFA’s Whole of Football Plan, “In the absence of a measurable and sustained increase in the value of A-League licences, it is difficult for clubs to commercially justify increased investment in their facilities, on-field and off-field capabilities.”

Thankfully though, the current deal is locked in until 2023 and even if it was to drop by a third then that still would leave about the same amount as the clubs are currently getting.

All FFA would have to do would be to increase player registration fees to make up the shortfall, which they will have to do anyway if the league becomes independent.

But perhaps the biggest unknown in all of this is what Channel 10 will do. Not only have they given up Formula One and Supercars for the most part to FOX, but they have lost the BBL to Channel 7 and the NBL to 9.

Because of this the A-League might appeal to them, especially if they get to receive all broadcast advertising revenue unlike their current deal which stipulates that most goes to FOX who they simulcast from.

In conclusion, the new expansion clubs might not be able to sway FOX to increase the size of the next TV deal as FFA might hope but the A-League show will still go on regardless. But if Channel 10 who are now owned by CBS choose to enter the fray then the A-League could get a whole new lease on life.



https://www.theroar.com.au/author/the-crowd/
 

ALX22

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Sunshine Coast
Australia U-23 National Team
 

RADICAL RABBIT

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The A-League's salary cap has outlived its usefulness

If the citizens of Gosford wanted to save their football club they would fill every available seat for the Mariners’ next home game against Adelaide on March 31.

The fact that they won’t says a lot about what’s gone wrong with the A-League.

The Central Coast Mariners don’t belong to the people of Gosford, they belong to Mike Charlesworth.

And while it would be easy to rip into Charlesworth following the Mariners’ humiliating 8-2 loss to Wellington Phoenix on Saturday night, there are bigger issues at play.

One is the fact that Charlesworth clearly doesn’t have the funds to bankroll the Mariners on his own.

How fair is it then to lay the entirety of the blame for the Mariners’ predicament at his feet?

And when is Football Federation Australia going to acknowledge the salary cap isn’t helping the A-League, it’s hindering it?

Dom Bossi wrote a fantastic piece for the Sun-Herald yesterday in which he pointed out, among other things, that the turnover of players at A-League clubs is among the highest in world football.

Far from offering the A-League stability, the habit of signing players on short-term contracts has instead resulted in a never-ending revolving door of faces.

And where cash-strapped foreign clubs often resort to selling players as a means of generating income, the lack of transfer fees in the A-League means our clubs can’t even do that.

So what is the league doing to help owners like Charlesworth create revenue? Not a whole lot as far as anyone can tell.

The salary cap hasn’t even had the effect of equalising the league, which is surely the whole point of having one in the first place.

The big clubs are still the big clubs and the rest do what they can to keep up.

At the end of the day – or in this case, one of the strangest rounds of the season – the salary cap has outlived its usefulness.

Little wonder the ten clubs are so determined to run an independent A-League when the current constraints effectively doom them to a cycle of mediocrity.

But on that note, the Mariners players themselves can hardly come away from a second 8-2 loss within the space of a year without additional scrutiny.

Matt Simon

(Photo by Tony Feder)

Where’s the professionalism? Where’s the passion? Where’s the pride?

In many countries that sort of defeat would warrant a visit from the club’s hardcore fans at the next training session, but here in Australia it seems to be all smiles and sunshine at the end of every game.

It’s pretty clear that the lack of relegation – or any real consequences for finishing bottom – has fostered a culture of indifference.

It’s almost as if having the same ten teams play the same number of rounds with many of the same players every single season for the past seven years maybe wasn’t the most sensible idea?

As it stands even expansion can’t come quickly enough, with the A-League in danger of imploding before Macarthur South West Sydney even joins the league.

And the addition of Western United for the 2019-20 campaign – although desperately needed – means there’ll be a bye every round next season.

Meanwhile, the dwindling few are expected to keep putting their hands in their pockets and turn up week in and week out to support a league that is fast dying on its feet.

The whole A-League needs a reboot, starting with the salary cap and hopefully ending with the competition looking more like every other football league around the world and less like a closed shop run by a bunch of accountants.

Things simply aren’t working right now, and in truth they haven’t been for a long time.

Changes need to be made.

Because two 8-2 results within the space of 12 months might be an anomaly, but three would be nothing short of a disgrace.

 

RADICAL RABBIT

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Players leading push to abolish A-League salary cap
By Dominic Bossi

March 9, 2019 — 5.29pm

A week in which A-League clubs' ability to compete in Asia came under the microscope has coincided with a push to abolish the salary cap by the players themselves.

After 15 years of strict financial regulations governing A-League player wages, the players' union, Professional Footballers Australia, is sewing the seeds for the removal of the cap when CBA negotiations begin with Football Federation Australia.

Old model: John Didulica, right, says the salary cap has outlived its usefulness.
Old model: John Didulica, right, says the salary cap has outlived its usefulness.

Their motivation is to end the high turnover of players, improve the financial viability of the competition, increase player pathways and the development of youth in Australia. A report that will form the basis of their argument to gradually remove the salary cap contains significant research comparing the A-League's on- and off-field performance against other leagues and questions whether the A-League salary cap actually ensures competitive balance in football.

"Fifteen years on, we operate the same model that has been tinkered with around the edges. It’s no longer fit for purpose. The current system is theoretically supported for two reasons. The first is competitive balance, which data over recent years will challenge. The second reason is club sustainability, yet the current model denies clubs access to potentially significant financial upside," PFA chief John Didulica said.

The current regulations allow 23-man squads under a $3.03 million salary cap, of which two designated players can be paid outside, exceptions for long-serving players, homegrown players and mature-age rookies.

Despite recent concessions, the A-League still has one of the highest rates of player turnover in world football. This year, almost two-thirds of the players in the competition are coming off contract, illustrating a culture where clubs resort to short-term deals. According to those working in the industry, that's largely perpetuated by the salary cap constraints.

"If you look at the list of players that are out of contract every year it is frightening," player agent John Grimaud said. "That’s an indictment on the league and you wonder why we don’t get transfer fees for players. Clubs aren't inclined to scout properly so they don’t take risks with signing players. They sign them for one year and if they make it, good. If they don’t, they cut them and move on. That’s the problem with the salary cap."

Australian football is missing out on significant revenue streams which the PFA claims is due to the salary cap. With short-term contracting so widespread, the A-League is missing out on the massive global spike in transfer fees. In the past six years, transfer fees received by Asian clubs has doubled from $84 million to $170m. Over that period, transfer revenue in the A-League fell from $3.7m to $2.6m.

"The salary cap has proven to act as a barrier to our players developing as footballers, to clubs building sustainable businesses that capitalise on the growth of the global football economy and to our sport building better teams and competing – on all fronts – with greater success," Didulica said

Against teams operating without salary cap restrictions and squad size constraints, Australian teams are falling behind in other income streams. In AFC Champions League performances bonuses and prize money, competing Australian teams received $326,000 last year. Japanese teams were rewarded with over $6m.

By failing to retain more national team players, many of whom are no longer playing in high-profile European leagues, A-League teams are lagging behind in World Cup benefits paid by FIFA to clubs to compensate clubs for the number of players took part in the tournament. From the 2018 World Cup in Russia, $1.7m was paid to A-League teams, South Korean teams received $4.4m and J-League clubs were given $5.1m .

Money aside, there are questions raised by the PFA over the competitive balance provided by the cap. According to PFA research, there is a greater proportion of games won by a margin of three goals or more in the A-League than the major five European leagues. The A-League has had a more varied list of winners, in part due to the final series, though Central Coast Mariners appear set to finish bottom for three of the past four seasons and the points ratio between wooden spooners and premiers has almost doubled in the past nine years.

The clubs are yet to reach consensus on the future of the salary cap. Some appreciate the cost certainty. Others see it as preventing them from reaching their full potential and competing for silverware in Asia.

United under the Australian Professional Football Clubs Association, the A-League club owners are split. The APFCA chairman, Western Sydney Wanderers owner Paul Lederer, says the matter remains a delicate topic within the group but one they must address in the near future.

No consensus: Paul Lederer says the issue of the salary cap must be handled delicately among club owners.
No consensus: Paul Lederer says the issue of the salary cap must be handled delicately among club owners.

“It’s a major subject that has got to be considered very carefully," Lederer said. "There will be discussions in the next few weeks about that, probably very shortly as to where do we stand as clubs and what do we want to do.”

They appear unanimous in relaxing the cap constraints. As part of their submission for a new A-League operating model, APFCA want to increase the number of foreign players in the A-League from the current limit of five and follow in the footsteps of the MLS in USA, where clubs have eight spots on average.

However, if current trends are anything to go by, more foreigners means a higher wage bill. The A-League is on course to become independent from the FFA, giving clubs significantly more influence in the operations, rules and regulations of the competition meaning they might get their wish.

Under the proposed new operating model, the FFA will - at the very least - retain a golden vote on the board of the new entity, enabling them to block or pass any motion or amendment. Already, the FFA is looking at ways on relaxing the tight restrictions on squads and salaries but are not yet willing to remove the cap entirely.

"Don’t throw it away but fix it," Head of the A-League, Greg O'Rourke, said. "You’d want to make changes around home-grown talent, loyalty players, more investment in Australian players. You might want to talk about having more designated players in and out of the cap to build the quality of the product."

 

RADICAL RABBIT

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Sometimes I talk to Gino Marra, who is the deputy chairman of the new Macarthur - South West Sydney club, and he told me that towards the end of this month he will let me know how the votes are trending in regards to the club's colours, name, etc. I have been reading a lot of comments from fans about the new club and the 2 most popular nicknames for the club have been "Bulls" and "Magpies". Black and white is very popular for the team's colours. A lot of people who live around Liverpool, Fairfield, Bankstown want "South West" in the name, and a lot of people who live in the Macarthur region want "Macarthur" in the name - surprise surprise. So from all that it could be "Macarthur South West Bulls" or "Macarthur South West Magpies" or maybe they'll just keep the working name "Macarthur South West United"...
 
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RADICAL RABBIT

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So this is the new Western Melbourne club...

Western United's logo revealed
Western United's new logo will reflect the club's green, black and white colouring in a simple design.

Western United's new logo.
(Western United's new logo.)

The Age understands the logo will be as pictured (right) or a very similar variation.

The badge's colours reflect the club's green, black and white playing strip, which was selected by fans in a popular poll.

It has the club's name and date of establishment at the top in white lettering.

Beneath it are the stylised letters W and U, the former in white, the second in green, with a black background to make the white and green stand out.

The club will reportedly wear green and black stripes, while its away kit will be white.

Western United will enter the league in the 2019-20 season.

 

Rabbits 21

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So this is the new Western Melbourne club...

Western United's logo revealed
Western United's new logo will reflect the club's green, black and white colouring in a simple design.

Western United's new logo.'s new logo.
(Western United's new logo.)

The Age understands the logo will be as pictured (right) or a very similar variation.

The badge's colours reflect the club's green, black and white playing strip, which was selected by fans in a popular poll.

It has the club's name and date of establishment at the top in white lettering.

Beneath it are the stylised letters W and U, the former in white, the second in green, with a black background to make the white and green stand out.

The club will reportedly wear green and black stripes, while its away kit will be white.

Western United will enter the league in the 2019-20 season.

Booooooooooooo
 

RADICAL RABBIT

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1523

New club's concerns over new A-League
By Nicholas Rupolo
Mar 14 2019 - 10:17AM

Macarthur South West United Football director Sam Krslovic believes one of the biggest challenges facing his new A-League side is the uncertainty that comes with the transition to an independent A-League.

Speaking at a Macarthur South West United community forum in Canley Vale, Krslovic lamented the precariousness of the new A-League club's position as the landscape of the league's administration changes.

With the South-West Sydney club not scheduled to kick a ball until 2020/21 season, the top brass at the club have been embedding roots in the community and a commitment to youth development.

And a key focus has been a commitment to a team and club culture that is family friendly and built on "...honest, hard work".

They also revealed their ambition to make existing NPL clubs part of a development pathway for the team via a feeder club system.

Camden Tigers, SD Raiders and Macarthur Rams are on the radar to join South West's player development scheme.

But Krslovic expressed his concerns over the independent A-League model – currently being formulated by the FFA and current club owners – and the challenges it poses for the SWS project.

"Even though we are an accepted club at the moment, we don't have a seat at the table," he told the forum.

"The challenge for us is the independent league, will it suit us? will it harm us?

"The other challenge, is we have no voting rights at club or FFA level. We don't get to put forward our community or club thoughts at the moment.

"That's the biggest thing that could affect us. That's a huge challenge."

He added: "There is a financial risk, the revenue stream could be greater with an independent A-League."

Deputy club chairman Gino Marra added: "Because of the relationship we have with A-League clubs we know what is going on, we know what the clubs are trying to achieve."

Further community questioning revolved around other prospects in Australian football such as promotion and relegation and a second division.

Krslovic put his full weight behind a promotion and relegation system.

"We are in favour of promotion and relegation," said Krslovic. "Central Coast Mariners are the best example – we need promotion and relegation.

"It creates excitement, every game means something and it doesn't allow complacency. It harvests greater work ethic and great desire."

 

RADICAL RABBIT

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The big change the A-League needs to make

The troubles at Central Coast Mariners have now put the club’s future in doubt with unsuccessful bids now circling like vultures after their licence.

According to The World Game, “There are whispers from within the New Leagues Working Group – the body tasked with formulating the structure of the framework for an independently run competition – that the Mariners’ licence might be distributed elsewhere, possibly to a second team in Brisbane or even to Canberra.”

This then raises the question, if the Mariners licence can be distributed elsewhere, then so can those of Melbourne City and Wellington Phoenix.

So, with Mariners, City and Phoenix all on the chopping block and Western United entering, we could have as many as four new teams next season with Canberra, Tasmania and Wollongong being the people’s choices. But more realistically, it would be Canberra, Macarthur and South East Melbourne.

Canberra seems to have the support of other clubs as well as tentative support from FFA now that they have placed the next two teams in Sydney and Melbourne, in line with demands by Fox.

Macarthur are set to enter in the 2020-21 season and this could be brought forward by taking over Wellington’s licence, while Melbourne City’s licence could go to South East Melbourne. You may think that CFG are too big to lose, but they have few friends.

Melbourne City fans


If City spend big, they’ll dominate the A-League and none of the other teams want that, but if they are stingy as they are in New York then they won’t draw big crowds or TV audiences.

They’re a waste of space and are only in the competition to make up the numbers for broadcasting purposes

.By comparison, South East Melbourne will have their own separate stadium within 100 meters of Dandenong Station giving them a clear geographic point of difference. They will also be able to play matches at a temporary 8000-seat rectangular stadium at Casey Fields during its construction.

As it says on their bid website, “The main pitch will initially have the capacity to cater for up to 8000 spectators if necessary and will be capable of hosting W-League and National Youth League fixtures, as well as A-League games on an interim basis.”

But what about Tasmania and Wollongong?

Well they would only be left out if the number of teams remains at 11. One of them could take over Macarthur’s 2020 licence as their entry would have been brought forward. Of the two it would probably be Wollongong who get in to make up the 12 due to WIN Stadium.

Only trouble is, it’s still going to be a 12-team league with an AFL-style fixture list where teams do not play each other an even number of times throughout the campaign.

Ideally, you would expand to a 14-team league with a regular home-and-away season. This would allow Tasmania – which is projected to soon have 26,000 participants – to come in to bring the league to 13 teams.

Then, as team 14, you could even bring back Central Coast after a break from the A-League.

But why would you bring back a club after ejecting them? Well, there are three main reasons.

Firstly, they are one of the most successful clubs in the A-League with one championship win from four grand final appearances in addition to winning two A-League premierships and being twice runners-up.

Secondly, despite their appalling current run of form in recent times the Mariners have an average attendance across all A-League seasons of 8913, which is just under the magic 10,000.

If they also had derbies against Macarthur and Wollongong then they could probably get over that figure if they are well managed. They should be able to bounce back.

And thirdly, if the Mariners are included in the league in addition to Canberra and Wollongong then you cover the four main cities around Sydney: Newcastle, Wollongong, Gosford and Canberra. It completes the set.

When you also add in Sydney, Western Sydney and Macarthur that gives you a hub of seven clubs in and around Sydney all within driving distance, much like the NRL.

Now the current TV deal was only designed for 12 teams, but an independent league can not only redistribute licences, they can renegotiate the TV deal as well to make 14 teams possible.

If the Fox deal is reduced to finish in 2022 instead of 2023 then that money can be brought forward.

Alternatively, the clubs might have to take a haircut and accept less than they want with the aim of rebuilding the value of the league over the next couple of seasons should TV viewership increase with the renewed interest.

An independent A-League comes with risks but it also comes with opportunities, including the possibility of redistributing licences and renegotiating TV deals.

With a regular home-and-away season and a bunch of new teams, interest levels could spike significantly.

These are the clubs that should make up a 14-team A-League: Sydney FC, Western Sydney Wanderers, Macarthur Magpies, Newcastle Jets, Wollongong Wolves, Central Coast Mariners, Canberra United, Melbourne Victory, Western United, South East Melbourne Athletic, Tasmania Rangers, Brisbane Roar, Perth Glory and Adelaide United.