Opinion Rolex Sydney to Hobart 2019

Southy

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Scallywag led for much of day two before losing pole position in the afternoon, and ultimately finishing fourth today.

Skipper David Witt said it was a collision with a shark that slowed Scallywag's pace, adding the crew was gutted.

"We had a shark hit the rudder, broke its back on the rudder, and the boat wiped out," he said, Southy southsport

"We had to pull sails down, back it up and get the shark off and that lost us all the places.

"Then to come back and try to beat Wild Oats at the death there with 30 seconds or something in it — I dunno, it's killing me this race."
:eek: Gee, that's amazing, never heard of that ever happening before.
.
 
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S J

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We went up the Derwent in a big 2 or 3 masted schooner. Quite exhilarating - especially with the wind. .

A tourist thing but really fun if you're ever in Hobart.
 
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Rabbits 21

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Southy southsport, not a peep out of Rad, I’d say he’s butthurt lolololololololololo, good on you though Southy for coming in and still chatting even though who you wanted to win lost!
 
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Rabbits 21

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A slow night on the race track in the 2019 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race, some of the bulk of the fleet struggling to get five knots from their boats, but good news is on the way, the Bureau of Meteorology predicting a northerly breeze of 15 to 20 knots to reach the bulk of the fleet by midday today.



This morning, the TP52 Stay Calm Hungary, drifted over the Castray Esplanade finish line at 5.50am, her crew looking weather worn, but wearing wide grins none the less. The reason? Last year Aron ‘Roni’ Ormandlaki did not get very far in the race, as the yacht was dismasted.

This year, the Hungarian yachtsman purchased the yacht, and being a rigger located in Sydney, completely re-rigged her and voila, he and the crew finished the race.

“Good to finish the race. During it, I said this is terrible, it is so long, but by the time you finish, all of that is forgotten and you feel good to finish this race,” he said this morning dockside.

It was all smiles aboard Frederic Puzin’s French entry, Daguet 3, which finished at 7.58am. Daguet 3 had sat at the top of the standings in the battle for the Tattersall Cup, but when the north-easterly came in, they were overtaken by the formidable TP52s and larger boats.

Puzin and his 24-year-old daughter, Doris, sailed their first Rolex Sydney Hobart together and could not wipe the smiles from their faces as they docked. “We will be back, for sure,” were the first words from Daguet 3’s owner.

“We had a great race with a good crew,” he said of the smattering of round-the-world sailors on his crew, such as Sam Goodchild and Frenchmen Thomas Rouxel and Nicolas Troussel.

And the boat? “Yes, I am glad I bought this boat. It is very good and we will take her back to Europe after a few days here (in Tasmania),” he said of the Ker 46 formerly named Patrice that he purchased from Sydney yachtsman, Tony Kirby.

Asked what they would do in next few days, Doris, who sails regularly with her father in international offshore events, said, “We will have a look around and yes, we will try the local scallop pies for sure.”

On the 1993 Sydney Hobart winner (then known as Cuckoos Nest) Filepro, Tasmanian owner Tim Gadsby reported from the Tasmanian Coast: “It’s been a busy night. We had an exciting time last night (Friday night) surfing in 25-30 knots of breeze. We hit a new boat speed record for the race at about 5am – 20.4 knots.

“We’ve struggled for breeze today (Saturday), with many boats behind running down on us.

In the early evening he said from the 40-footer, “We’re finally moving again with 14 knots off breeze from the north-west. We’re running a full mainsail and Doyle Cableless Code Zero. We are now awaiting a south-easterly change tonight.”

On board Jason Close’s Beneteau First 47.7, Enigma, two of the crew, Isabel Rawlence and Chloe Tetlow took time out for a bit of fun in the light air to take some happy snaps and reported they were “enjoying the race.”

Twenty two boats only have finished the 2019 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race so far, due to a mix of conditions. A flood of boats are expected to arrive from 3pm onwards and throughout the night.

To-date only three boats have retired from the race: Hollywood Boulevard, Faster Forward and Minerva.

To follow the race and for all information, please go to: http://rolexsydneyhobart.com/
 
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Southy

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Sydney-Hobart: Age of the supermaxi is coming to an end
Supermaxi Comanche sails up the Derwent early on Saturday, accompanied by a flotilla of spectator craft, to claim line honours in the Sydney to Hobart. Picture: AFPSupermaxi Comanche sails up the Derwent early on Saturday, accompanied by a flotilla of spectator craft, to claim line honours in the Sydney to Hobart. Picture: AFP
  • By D.D. MCNICOLL
  • 8:30PM DECEMBER 29, 2019
  • NO COMMENTS
Comanche may have creamed the opposition for line honours in this year’s Rolex Sydney to Hobart race, but it could mark the beginning of the end for yacht-racing’s dinosaurs.
Within a year of two, foiling monohulls capable of far higher sustained speeds than the supermaxis will be the stars of the ocean racing world.
In one of the most hotly contested Sydney-Hobart races for years, Jim Cooney and Samantha Grant’s Comanche proved to be the fastest off-the-wind supermaxi in the world when she romped away with the line honours victory in the 628 nautical mile race on Saturday morning.
READ NEXT
Comanche finished the bluewater classic just after 7.30am, having made the most of strong overnight winds down Tasmania’s east coast. She slowed in the River Derwent, hit by light winds, finishing in a time of one day, 18 hours, 30 minutes and 24 seconds.
The four other supermaxis were left looking less than super. InfoTrack, a yacht often described by her owner Christian Beck as “a dog”, was second over the line some 45 minutes behind Comanche. Wild Oats, the nine-time winner of the race, was third, another 58 minutes behind InfoTrack, and just 38 seconds ahead of the Hong Kong registered Scallywag.
The fifth boat home was the recently modified Black Jack, which was 15 minutes behind Scallywag.
READ MORE:Co-skipper the secret powerhouse behind Comanche’s success
All the yachts but Wild Oats had led the race at one stage of the journey, which was dominated by downwind running.
Scallywag reportedly hit a shark during the wild run down the Tasmanian east coast on Friday night and was forced to stop sailing to remove it from where it was wedged in the yacht’s keel.
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But changes in yacht design mean this could be the last time the five local supermaxis dominate the race.
No new supermaxis have been built since US web billionaire Jim Clark commissioned Comanche in 2014 and only two others, the American owned Rio 100, and Mike Slade’s British supermaxi Leopard, still regularly sail.
Rio 100, the only supermaxi still equipped with manual coffee grinder winches rather than electric or hydraulic power, is on the market with an asking price of $US300,000 ($430,000).
It is expected the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia will change the Hobart race rules to allow a monohull yacht equipped with hydrofoils, provided it passes stability safety tests, to compete in next year’s race. Foil equipped monohulls will compete in the next America’s Cup in New Zealand in 2021 and the next edition of The Ocean Race.
Cooney said on Saturday he expected a foiling 60-footer to beat his supermaxi in the next two to three years.
 
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Rabbits 21

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Final boat finishes 2019 Rolex Sydney Hobart
The final boat to finish the 2019 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race, local Tasmanian boat Take Five, has arrived at Constitution Dock.

Skipper Ian Gannon said his crew endured storms and almost exhausted supplies but were elated to make it to the finish line in an elapsed time of five days, 23 hours and 41 minutes
"We spent New Year's Eve trying to get as far south as we could as quickly as we could," Gannon said.
"It handles [the storms] beautifully.
"I think everyone's special for getting here... my heart goes out to those competitors who didn't make it... I'm just happy we made it here with no damage and no breakages.
"Supplies were running low. I did plan for seven days' rations but we've gone through them all... Another day out there would have finished everything, including toilet paper."
Will they do it again?
"Let me have a few rums first, then I might answer that," Gannon said.
"It's always a great race and I've always wanted to do it in my own boat... but maybe next time is in a much larger vessel!"
For Take Five crewman Malcolm Cooper, the 2019 Rolex Sydney Hobart was a glorious, enjoyable and challenging journey.
"I'm very tired and weary - I just spent 18 hours on the rail... but it was a special race," Cooper said.
"I've done a lot of ocean racing but this was a race I wanted to do - tick."
A total of 157 boats took to the start line for the historic 75th running of the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia's 628-nautical-mile bluewater classic - with 154 reaching the finish line. Only three boats were forced to retire.
 

S J

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I thought it might win handicap.


Final boat finishes 2019 Rolex Sydney Hobart
The final boat to finish the 2019 Rolex Sydney Hobart Yacht Race, local Tasmanian boat Take Five, has arrived at Constitution Dock.

Skipper Ian Gannon said his crew endured storms and almost exhausted supplies but were elated to make it to the finish line in an elapsed time of five days, 23 hours and 41 minutes
"We spent New Year's Eve trying to get as far south as we could as quickly as we could," Gannon said.
"It handles [the storms] beautifully.
"I think everyone's special for getting here... my heart goes out to those competitors who didn't make it... I'm just happy we made it here with no damage and no breakages.
"Supplies were running low. I did plan for seven days' rations but we've gone through them all... Another day out there would have finished everything, including toilet paper."
Will they do it again?
"Let me have a few rums first, then I might answer that," Gannon said.
"It's always a great race and I've always wanted to do it in my own boat... but maybe next time is in a much larger vessel!"
For Take Five crewman Malcolm Cooper, the 2019 Rolex Sydney Hobart was a glorious, enjoyable and challenging journey.
"I'm very tired and weary - I just spent 18 hours on the rail... but it was a special race," Cooper said.
"I've done a lot of ocean racing but this was a race I wanted to do - tick."
A total of 157 boats took to the start line for the historic 75th running of the Cruising Yacht Club of Australia's 628-nautical-mile bluewater classic - with 154 reaching the finish line. Only three boats were forced to retire.
Great to see - what a race for them.
 
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