Opinion Politics: Comment & Opinions. WARNING: RUDE WORDS & DIFFERING VIEWS.

Southy

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May 20, 2013
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Goats love it and a lot of farmers and even outlying councils have embraced using goats to reduce lantana and Blackberry.
You can use chemicals but natural treatment works well to and both the goats and you get a feed as a result.
Even certain breeds of chinese ducks love to eat weeds rather than crops to.
That is one sort of "Green" thing I do totally support.
I'd prefer goats to backburning to manage the undergrowth.
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stanleyg

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Lol McConkeys, a friend of mine went in there recently and said it was disgusting, gone downhill apparently.
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don't know who owns it now but it was great when the older members of the paddys owned it.
You could get the old man talking and he kept saying it was his "shout" while his son would shake his head and the daughter Tralee( yes named after the town and the "rose"contest) would get a bit upset if you asked if you could bar b que her kangaroo.
 
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stanleyg

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I'd prefer goats to backburning to manage the undergrowth.
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even goats wont eat dead bark or leaves and branches falling from gum trees or native bracken but I like the idea of mobile goat herders doing smaller clearances and helping farmers.
Its the perfect job for Greenies who want to get back to nature but still enjoy the benefits of the modern fossil fuel and mining world like mobile phones etc.
 
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Q'Billie Boy

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May 2, 2013
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If in your travels to these forests when it is safe to visit you see a new species or something that catches your eye, feel free to message me a photo of the plant and I will try my best to identify it.
 
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Southy

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May 20, 2013
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If in your travels to these forests when it is safe to visit you see a new species or something that catches your eye, feel free to message me a photo of the plant and I will try my best to identify it.
I don't go into the bush much these days, I previously travelled with a friend who is a renowned reptile expert.
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stanleyg

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If in your travels to these forests when it is safe to visit you see a new species or something that catches your eye, feel free to message me a photo of the plant and I will try my best to identify it.
A little bit of rain and those plants whose core is underground will sprout back if they havent been roasted.

Even with the intensity of our fires some flora will bounce back...and quickly. some might even mutate so having an interest in Botany could be an interesting time here ALX22
 
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stanleyg

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I don't go into the bush much these days, I previously travelled with a friend who is a renowned reptile expert.
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one good thing about fires in the Eurobodalla area is it will reduce a lot of ticks.
The cattle ticks are huge but its those smaller ones that love people down there.
 

Southy

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one good thing about fires in the Eurobodalla area is it will reduce a lot of ticks.
The cattle ticks are huge but its those smaller ones that love people down there.
Yeah, I have a friend whose mother died from a tick at Narooma.
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stanleyg

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Yeah, I have a friend whose mother died from a tick at Narooma.
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insidious little buggers. I had a a very small one bring down my 230lb mastiff. luckily the vets found the little blood sucker in time.
Lynches pub was good too. You could have a beer and fend off the brush tails
 

Southy

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insidious little buggers. I had a a very small one bring down my 230lb mastiff. luckily the vets found the little blood sucker in time.
Lynches pub was good too. You could have a beer and fend off the brush tails
Lynches was the premier pub in the old days and Highlands was for the deros, Highlands was bulldozed quite some years ago and now has great views over the inlet.

If you get a chance go to Bermagui pub for lunch, views right up the coast taking in Mt Dromedary...........very enjoyable.
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stanleyg

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Australian weather and climate is behaving exactly as it always has.
Drought, fires, flooding rains.
Global warmists except hardened activsts have quietly dropped "global warming " and changed to "climate change" a proven event that has been occurring for 4.5Billion years.
The argument of course is how much effect humans are having on this natural occurrence and how much we can reduce any impact we might have.
Activists as usual are only attacking countries that can be brow beaten into ruining their own economies or milked for money so the UN climatologists can travel the world for chat fests leaving big carbon footprints in their wake.
If they were genuinely concerned they would run these junkets by video link.

As for global warming it hasn't had any impact on our fires but poor land care management definitely has.
Speaking of the Eurobodalla shire Green , yes I said Green inspired councils introduced E ZONES .
As a result people were NOT allowed to clear land along side natural bush or create fire breaks on their OWN properties.
People objected and Council threatened them with BIG fines if they even mowed the grass in some cases.
The result was the last big fires we had down that way the only places left standing at TATHRA were due to some people breaking the law and ignoring council by creating fire breaks in these E ZONES. (enviro zones)..
Fires have resulted in the loss of a lot of property and SOME lives so far but nothing like the big fires in Victoria that the Green Labor government didn't learn anything from where a LOT of people lost their lives.
as an aside with soaring green power prices our Governments (all of them ) should consider winter.....over in Pakistan 100 people just froze to death from global warming COLD.
 

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Southy

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May 20, 2013
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Daceyville
Australian weather and climate is behaving exactly as it always has.
Drought, fires, flooding rains.
Global warmists except hardened activsts have quietly dropped "global warming " and changed to "climate change" a proven event that has been occurring for 4.5Billion years.
The argument of course is how much effect humans are having on this natural occurrence and how much we can reduce any impact we might have.
Activists as usual are only attacking countries that can be brow beaten into ruining their own economies or milked for money so the UN climatologists can travel the world for chat fests leaving big carbon footprints in their wake.
If they were genuinely concerned they would run these junkets by video link.

As for global warming it hasn't had any impact on our fires but poor land care management definitely has.
Speaking of the Eurobodalla shire Green , yes I said Green inspired councils introduced E ZONES .
As a result people were NOT allowed to clear land along side natural bush or create fire breaks on their OWN properties.
People objected and Council threatened them with BIG fines if they even mowed the grass in some cases.
The result was the last big fires we had down that way the only places left standing at TATHRA were due to some people breaking the law and ignoring council by creating fire breaks in these E ZONES. (enviro zones)..
Fires have resulted in the loss of a lot of property and SOME lives so far but nothing like the big fires in Victoria that the Green Labor government didn't learn anything from where a LOT of people lost their lives.
as an aside with soaring green power prices our Governments (all of them ) should consider winter.....over in Pakistan 100 people just froze to death from global warming COLD.
That was very well written Stan, congratulations on the post. 👍

Would you mind if I copy and paste that on another site?
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stanleyg

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That was very well written Stan, congratulations on the post. 👍

Would you mind if I copy and paste that on another site?
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help yourself.. I am no orator though and while I base it on facts its my opinion and as free speech is still mostly allowed in this country I am happy to exercise it just like anyone else should be able to.
 
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stanleyg

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It may not open but it is a article on an indigenous man who joined the rural fie service and ended up leaving.
He believes Red Tape AKA Green tape is bad for and believes more indigenous style burnng is needed

[QUOTE)
An Indigenous burn practitioner on Jan. 15 urged Australia’s state fire policymakers to “cut the stringent red tape” and “get the bush between their toes” as his people begin to assess the damage caused to their country following the devastating bushfire season.


On Wednesday, Kelvin Johnson, the senior land management officer with the Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council, was allowed to return to the bush in Kulnura, west of Wyong on the New South Wales Central Coast, for the first time to inspect damage after the Three Mile Fire burned through the region in December.
The practitioner, who joined the NSW Rural Fire Brigade in 1997 but left in 2003 and became a cultural burn practitioner, said that while there was widespread devastation, the area had fared better than others.

Johnson subscribes to the belief that the land can be managed using indigenous burning and mitigation techniques.

“That’s where science meets cultural burning. I now focus solely on putting the right fire on country.” Johnson said.

According to the Australian Walkabout Wildlife Park, cultural burning is “a traditional practice developed by Aboriginal people to enhance the health of the land and its people and includes burning (or prevention of burning) for the health of particular plants and animals.”

He said that although he understands the need for environmental and hazard reduction burns regulation, the current red tape is too stringent and urged policymakers to become better attuned to the country.

“They’ll stop you burning because of an orchard or a tree or a plant on a property,” he said.

“But then they do nothing about it—you can’t mitigate the risk. When a wildfire comes through, it doesn’t discriminate—it takes everything out.

“The environmental assessment process that all people have to abide by, those safeguards need to be there, but they need to understand there needs to be another way,”
The practitioner urged policymakers not to “just look at a book that you studied at university” but to “get out into the bush, feel the bush, they need to get the bush between their toes, smell the smells, listen to the sounds. Connect to that bush.”

Assessing the damage to the bush in Kulnura, Johnson said “70 percent of the biodiversity of the flora” has been lost. He estimates it will take 18 to 24 months for the land to recover.

Already trees are beginning the process of renewal while others have been completely decimated and some that were 400 years old had been hollowed out.
But the practitioner said that the disaster “needed to happen to cleanse the bush because it was so sick out there” and that “people in certain circles saw coming.”

“Everything was already sick. You couldn’t walk 10 meters in some spots, (the fuel load) was that thick,” he said.


An Indigenous burn practitioner on Jan. 15 urged Australia’s state fire policymakers to “cut the stringent red tape” and “get the bush between their toes” as his people begin to assess the damage caused to their country following the devastating bushfire season.


On Wednesday, Kelvin Johnson, the senior land management officer with the Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council, was allowed to return to the bush in Kulnura, west of Wyong on the New South Wales Central Coast, for the first time to inspect damage after the Three Mile Fire burned through the region in December.


An aerial view blackened bush, with some new regrowthAn aerial view blackened bush, with some new regrowth is seen on January 14, 2020 in Wytaliba, Australia. On the afternoon of Nov. 8, 2019. (Brook Mitchell/Getty Images)
The practitioner, who joined the NSW Rural Fire Brigade in 1997 but left in 2003 and became a cultural burn practitioner, said that while there was widespread devastation, the area had fared better than others.
Johnson subscribes to the belief that the land can be managed using indigenous burning and mitigation techniques.
“That’s where science meets cultural burning. I now focus solely on putting the right fire on country.” Johnson said.

According to the Australian Walkabout Wildlife Park, cultural burning is “a traditional practice developed by Aboriginal people to enhance the health of the land and its people and includes burning (or prevention of burning) for the health of particular plants and animals.”
He said that although he understands the need for environmental and hazard reduction burns regulation, the current red tape is too stringent and urged policymakers to become better attuned to the country.
“They’ll stop you burning because of an orchard or a tree or a plant on a property,” he said.
“But then they do nothing about it—you can’t mitigate the risk. When a wildfire comes through, it doesn’t discriminate—it takes everything out.
“The environmental assessment process that all people have to abide by, those safeguards need to be there, but they need to understand there needs to be another way,”
The practitioner urged policymakers not to “just look at a book that you studied at university” but to “get out into the bush, feel the bush, they need to get the bush between their toes, smell the smells, listen to the sounds. Connect to that bush.”

“That will give you a better understanding of what that bush needs. Not a piece of paper, not a university degree,” he added.
Assessing the damage to the bush in Kulnura, Johnson said “70 percent of the biodiversity of the flora” has been lost. He estimates it will take 18 to 24 months for the land to recover.
Already trees are beginning the process of renewal while others have been completely decimated and some that were 400 years old had been hollowed out.
regeneration Australia fireRegrowth is seen on bushfire damaged trees outside of Bateman’s Bay, South of Sydney, on Jan. 15, 2020. (AAP Image/Steven Saphore)
But the practitioner said that the disaster “needed to happen to cleanse the bush because it was so sick out there” and that “people in certain circles saw coming.”
“Everything was already sick. You couldn’t walk 10 meters in some spots, (the fuel load) was that thick,” he said.

On Jan. 9, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology announced that the very strong positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), which has been a big driver behind the country’s hot, dry conditions since September, has now eased into a neutral phase, with monsoon rains now reaching northern Australia.
A shift in another climatic driver from the south has also meant that more moisture is expected to reach further down the east coast from the tropics. [End quote)

You will notice in the last paragraph the comment from BOM....Basically it is a fancy way of talking about La Nina and El Ninos I have spoken about for a long time....nothing to do with global warming.
 
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